Tao of the Zentropist

February 11, 2009

The Zentropist Defined: The Fifth Attribute

It is perhaps ironic given the times in which we live that we will speak of Character and its crucial role as the fifth of the seven Primary Attributes of the Zentropist. It should come as no surprise to those reading these postings that the world has been in an economic crisis for some time, arising from both individual and collective failings of character, arising from those who seek only to take more than they contribute, and who lack the fortitude to “do the right thing” simply because it is, well, the right thing.

From the Zentropist standpoint, one must seek to develop, The character to remain humble while maintaining the confidence, bearing and integrity to transmit the wisdom gained from experience.” It’s a tall order, I realize, and only a liar will tell you that he or she has never fallen short of the mark. As has been observed, we often learn more from our failures than we do from our successes; perhaps this is simply hardwired into the human psyche, some feature set of our genetic programming, whether you view this as a product of some larger Creation guided by a “Great Architect of the Universe (to borrow a Freemasonry expression) or simply the result of random mutations and natural selection over time.

Humility and humbleness are traits that some interpret as weakness, and this is a terrible mistake. The moment we start believing in our own infallibility is the moment that we architect the beginning of our personal disaster. No one has all the answers, and the true Zentropist will accept this without reservation. It is not about faith, or lack thereof. The Zentropist must pursue Truth as guided by his or her conscience, fully aware that the path one walks is seldom as straight as one might initially believe. For that path will intersect with others, and by different routes the same destination may very well be reached, although the journeys will by definition be different for all.

What is most critical at this juncture for the budding Zentropist is that as the journey progresses, in spite of mistakes made (and some may be whoppers), and for whatever successes both great and small are celebrated, one must draw confidence in his or her ability to make a difference. The Zentropist does not aspire to be some “Superman” as defined by Nietzsche, but rather, seeks to set an example of persistence and perseverance by overcoming shortcomings, by turning former weaknesses into strengths, by leveraging strengths to achieve some greater good.

By moving forward and maintaining one’s integrity, by living true to the Primary Attributes which form the code and creed of the Zentropist, one will acquire wisdom which may be used to the benefit of one’s self and others.

Some may believe that our journey through life is walked on the precipice of a Great Abyss, which we may choose to acknowledge or not, and that our actions will indeed “echo through time” whether we realize this or not. Whether we gaze into the abyss, and whether or not it looks back are inconsequential; the Zentropist has a responsibility to share his or her gifts, however humble they may be perceived, for in doing so he or she will be rewarded one thousand-fold.

Thus speaks the Tao of the Zentropist…

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2 Comments »

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