Tao of the Zentropist

January 1, 2015

Perspective: When in Doubt, Get Some!

It is natural for many at this time of year to engage in introspection and take stock of things. That can be admirable, especially when it leads to further evolution and development. To that end, I offer the following thoughts…

Photographer: Tom Hall

“Mountain” Photographer: Tom Hall Image courtesy of Flickr

When a mountain comes into view…

Do you see it as an insurmountable obstacle? Or do you wonder what the view is like from the summit, or what lies on the other side?

The very things which may challenge us may also reveal great rewards. We can embrace the challenge and advance forward, or we can remain rooted to the spot or return to the comfort of what we think we know, only to invariably discover, that place is not quite the same as when we left it.

Scarcity and abundance…

Are always intertwined. One never exists without the other.

Mindset reveals our most closely held beliefs. Sometimes what we most desire is indeed scarce. But if we take stock of what is in abundance, how can we use this to obtain or acquire what we really want?

Perception is reality…

Pierce the veil. 

What we perceive to be true inevitably becomes our truth. Objective fact can be inconvenient under this circumstance. Remember that what another perceives will define his or her truth as well. If you cannot find mutually satisfactory definition, given the binary nature of “true or false?” conflict will result.

Use what you know today…

With rare exception, we all know more today than we did yesterday.

Experience may be gained through action or inaction. We learn from the outcomes of both. When outcomes are deemed not desirable, examine what led to them without rancor, bitterness or excessive regret. And avoid repeating the mistakes of yesterday today.

Do more…

Talk less.

Action ultimately trumps flowery talk and academic theory. Far too many pontificate and bloviate. Strategy requires execution. Execution emerges from tactics. Without the right tactics, applied at the right time, even a well considered strategy will fail.

Now is always available…

Use it wisely.

What has happened previously is over and done with. What may happen in the future is subject to change. Unless you believe in predestination. In which case, you will do what you will and the future will happen accordingly.

Trim your sails, adjust your course…

We cannot change the wind and the tide.

But we can harness them, and by keeping a weather eye, adjust as necessary to get where we want to go.

Acknowledge the Monkey Mind…

The Monkey Mind is rarely quiet and is ruled by emotion.

Emotion all too often clouds our judgment. Pause. Inhale. Exhale. Orient and find your center. Decisions made when ruled by emotion may in hindsight prove less than optimal, and sometimes quite poor. Seek to buy enough time to let the most unguarded moment pass. And then act decisively.

Remember…

The past should always inform us. But never define us.

What happened yesterday and all the days before was the result of things both within and outside of our control. The past is only prologue if we fail to exercise what we can currently control. Wiser decisions are always possible. Our fate, driven by unfolding possibilities, is fluid and always in motion.

Celebrate, mourn, move on…

Retain the lesson and those memories you cherish, but do not cling to what has passed.

There is a time and a season to every purpose under Heaven and Earth.

Regrets…

We’ve all got them. But seek to make them, “Too few to mention.”

Sometimes things don’t work out as we planned. Or if we are truthful with ourselves, as we desired, even if we failed to properly plan. Some opportunities, once lost, are not regained. But this is not always so. Do not punish yourself a second time. The moment of lost opportunity is punishment enough.

Impermanence…

This too shall pass.

It is our attachment to things which are the source of pleasure and pain. Life will contain such highs and lows. Things happen in their time.

Beware those who claim to have all the answers…

Those who possess true wisdom understand that which they do not know.

We live in an era where self-proclaimed experts abound. Always consider the source. Good intentions with ill-conceived counsel or inappropriate action can be as detrimental to our welfare as those who act with indifference or outright malice.

Decide what matters…

This is your touchstone.

Over the course of your life, your answer may change. That’s not necessarily good or bad. But you must always be clear on what matters to you if you wish to make decisions aligned with your values.

Originally published on LinkedIn Pulse on 30 December 2014.

June 26, 2013

Welcome to Surveillance Society

Governments and private industry have a vested interest in knowing what we are all about – should this come as a surprise to anyone in this age? The fact that Edward Snowden has publicly leaked information about the scope and substance of at least some (and perhaps not all) of the U.S. government’s ongoing programs will perhaps spur some much needed debate on the subject, but for those who find this revelatory, I would point to the public disclosure of ECHELON more than a decade ago as indicative of what direction the world is heading. Quite frankly, my own personal operating assumption has been that digital channels as well as voice communications have been subject to intercept and monitoring for a long time now; the only question was, how often was this capability actually used? It’s pretty disturbing that the default setting appears to be to capture and archive everything, in effect establishing the boundaries of the “haystack” before searching for “the needle.” And with questionable oversight and accountability, the potential for abuse is staggering, even as we are told that sprawling data collection is necessary to “keep us safe.”

BIG DATA AND ALL ITS IMPLICATIONS

These days, it seems that if you don’t have a substantial digital footprint, you don’t exist, and while privacy advocates might relish this, given the convenience as well as outright necessity in some instances of maintaining an online presence it’s increasingly hard to do. For example, business networking and simple prudence tend to enforce the notion that a professional profile on LinkedIn is a necessity to find or maintain employment. If you don’t have a profile, you risk being seen as hopelessly outdated or “out of touch,” and even if happily employed (and this includes owning your own business), many customers and more importantly, prospective customers expect to be able to find relevant information about you without expending too much effort. Public profiles are in part seen as a means of validation and possible future recruitment (and prospecting for those selling goods and services), as well as a tool for networking and business intelligence gathering.

As consumers, we tend to enjoy the benefits of data analysis and relevancy; the recommendation engines of leading commerce sites are based not only on our past purchase history but our browsing activity, comments, and even the profiles of other people suspected of harboring similar interests and habits online.  While this is arguably a convenience when we are in shopping and a way to introduce us to products that we might otherwise miss mode (as well as a great way for companies to encourage spur-of-the-moment consumption to boost their bottom line), this data trail follows us and can quickly start to define us.

ONCE YOU’RE IN THE SYSTEM, YOU’RE IN FOR LIFE

Another issue to consider is that once we have deliberately or inadvertently established certain patterns and behavioral attributes online, deviation from these norms could very well trigger algorithms which flag us for closer investigation. For example, if an individual goes from very active and robust use of email, social media and other online activity, and then abruptly trails off, who is to say that this doesn’t trigger certain surveillance tripwires? While an abrupt curtailing or termination of such activity might have very innocent explanations, it could also signal more serious concerns from the perspective of a government or corporation. From the corporate point of view, has this consumer lost interest in their offerings? Maybe it’s time to send coupons or other promotional material to re-spark interest. From the government point of view, is this individual now incapacitated, deceased or going to ground for perhaps more nefarious purposes? Would it be prudent to inquire into the individual’s health records, financial institutions or credit card providers to see what recent activity (or lack thereof) is revealed?

It has been observed that as surveillance grows and becomes more acceptable (or even palatable) to the populace, it has a corrosive effect on liberty. Robust access to behavioral data is a sure path to predictive profiling, and the potential for misuse or worse, misinterpretation of the data must give one pause, not to mention the ramifications of theft of such data by hackers or unscrupulous parties acting from not only outside the system, but possibly within it.

HOW DOES THIS BODE FOR AUTHENTICITY?

In social media and marketing, “authenticity” has become a buzzword du jour, used to convey the sense of “keeping it real” in one’s interactions with the outside world. I’ve historically felt that for those who feel the need to constantly harp on this subject, it raises into question how much of their authenticity is genuine and how much is manufactured, sort of like the illusion that is “reality TV.” Perhaps more insidiously, the more that one reveals to the world at large, the more this data can be mined, aggregated and analyzed not only in an effort to manipulate the individual’s consumer choices, but even to influence and to some degree control behavior and attitudes as well. While some might see this as paranoid or alarmist, social media accounts are a treasure trove of information which people voluntarily populate, requiring data collection and analysis, and perhaps occasional phishing attacks and social engineering to further exploit.

Ultimately, technology has enabled the Pandora’s Box of mythology to become reality, and like all things, has brought both welcome progress as well as arguably less beneficial developments to our world. We are fast learning, even in countries with democratically elected governments, that whether or not the political elite truly represent the “will of the people” is open to debate, and furthermore, that the vast bureaucracies and sprawling public and private apparatus established to enable modern societies is subject to exploitation from both within and without. Any thinking person who is not at least a little bit unsettled by the state of things deserves to realize that the new boss is exactly the same as the old boss…

July 24, 2012

Inauthentic Authenticity

Image courtesy of StockFreeImages.com

There seems to be quite a bit of chatter and advice on the topic of “authenticity” as it applies to social media. For all the talk that people, as well as brands (and many like to emphasize that individuals are now “brands” too) need to be authentic to connect with their intended audience, there’s something rather disingenuous about all of the attention focused on this subject. Perhaps like “non-scripted television,” a.k.a. “Reality TV,” what is presented to us in social media behaviors is more often than not artifice, until proven otherwise. And it’s the “until proven otherwise” part that is of greatest interest…

WHAT IS AUTHENTICITY ANYWAY?

No one likes to be played for a sucker. Surely this is not a controversial or debatable point. And while social media presents the opportunity to reveal a lot about an individual’s personality, passions and beliefs, it is also not immune from manipulation. For example, some celebrities have massive Twitter followings in part because those connecting to them believe on some level that they are now part of this person’s “inner circle.”  I guess the allure of 140-character tidbits leads some to believe they now have a “relationship” with the other party, but if that’s what passes for meaningful connection, it’s a rather shallow and contrived arrangement. Being authentic is not necessarily about “being on message” and “building a brand” but rather, remaining true and constant to the core values and beliefs that one holds. The moment that a conscious decision is made to “spin” a message or behave in a proscribed manner is the moment in which “authenticity” is lost and play-acting begins.

KEEPING IT REAL

For those who want to present the world with a “window into their life,” social media can certainly be a useful tool, but there’s a fine line between genuine behavior, whether learned or instinctual, and performance. We may strive to uphold a certain ideal, and present to the world a certain image, but if we truly don’t embody the phantasm which we’re selling, inconsistencies start to quickly emerge.

Trying to cover up mistakes, errors in judgment, or past shortcomings is about rewriting history and does not preserve authenticity. It actually undermines it. Arguably, it’s easier to respect someone who is striving to evolve and attain certain far-reaching and ambitious accomplishments, and who may encounter failures and setbacks along the way, than those who claim flawless results each time they go to bat or squabble over the lowest hanging fruit.

One is reminded of the wise and perceptive words of Marcus Aurelius who stated, “The measure of a man is the worth of the things he cares about.” One can learn a great deal about someone by the subjects, triggers and stimuli which provoke a response while they are busy engaging with others on the Internet. It’s not difficult to be brave and combative when sitting behind a computer or tapping into a smartphone or tablet when one is not facing another party; consequently, social filters often come off and reveal what someone really thinks and their true nature.

HOW TO TELL A GENUINE FAKE

Image courtesy of StockFreeImages.com

So how do we avoid the frauds and schemers and delusional self-promoters? Can it be done? Should it be done? Ultimately, one has to look for consistency, because over time, it’s hard to maintain a false face without cracks appearing in the veneer. I find people’s off the cuff remarks, comments and answers to often be far more revealing than what might be posted in a blog, or a profile, or even a discussion thread which are more subject to editing and even ghostwriting. Emotional responses to another party’s question or posting or tweet which are triggered without much forethought may give greater clues to a person’s character and psychological makeup than more measured and considered responses delivered after a longer delay.

Most people struggle to reconcile the person who they wish to be, and want to portray themselves to be to others, with who they actually are in the moment. I don’t believe that people can remain static indefinitely; they need to evolve and change or they will find themselves relegated to a category of either caricature or irrelevance. I personally subscribe to the notion that, “Action reveals character,” and all pontification aside, it is how people behave, particularly in times of stress, when quick response is demanded, or when they think that they are unobserved, which truly reveals who they actually are. All the rest is measured commentary.

You cannot manufacture authenticity, and slapping a label on something doesn’t make it so. We simply are who we are until we change; whether that change is conscious and deliberate, or forced upon us by circumstance, is simply the mechanism and should not be mistaken for the result…

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